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I find myself answering a lot of questions on StackOverflow about sockets and network programming. I typically answer a lot questions from developers who are new to sockets and network coding - and they typically repeat the same mistakes.

These common mistakes range from mishandling of function return codes, not understanding TCP stream sockets, assumptions about message sizes, buffer overruns, and bad design patterns.

It's very easy to get socket code to "mostly work" - especially when testing is limited to the same subnet or same machine. Then the developer is left wondering why it doesn't seem to work as well when deployed to the Internet.

I am considering writing a blog article on "top 10 mistakes developers make with socket code". The text would include sample code with commentary. And then I might reference the text when answering future questions on StackOverflow.

After I'm done writing it up, would it be permissible to solicit for editorial and technical feedback on it through the CodeReview site? I don't profess to be the world's greatest socket expert, but someone who hangs out on CodeReview might be.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It sounds like you already pretty much know what you're doing; you'll probably get better feedback on usenet. \$\endgroup\$ – Dagg Feb 10 '12 at 23:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GGG - People still read usenet ??? \$\endgroup\$ – selbie Feb 11 '12 at 5:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Post something there and find out, I think you'll be surprised. \$\endgroup\$ – Dagg Feb 11 '12 at 9:37
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As long as you aren't asking for feedback on your writing, which is off-topic here, but rather on the code itself then I think the question would be acceptable.

However, I don't know whether you'll get the feedback you want. Most of the feedback here is concerned with style and performance issues. You seem to be more concerned with code correctness. I'm not sure whether you'll get the kind of feedback you are looking for here.

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