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I'm new to both this site and to real-life code reviews, but I've got heaps of experience with other SE sites. In a similar line to How should I interpret upvotes when I get no other responses?, I'm interested in what voting behaviour "means" on this site.

I asked a question which seems to have received a decent amount of traffic. There's one answer, and currently I appear to have been the only person to vote on it. There are no comments or alternate answers.

Should I draw any conclusions from the fact that there seem to be a decent number of people visiting my question and voting on the question, but not voting on the answer? My gut instinct is to interpret it as a sign that the points made in the review are legitimate and certainly not wrong (no downvotes or comments), and that there's nothing burningly obvious they've missed (no alternate answers or 'consider X' comments), but they're more like low-priority 'nice to have' suggestions or reasonable preferences than burning insights that I should act on immediately (no upvotes).

I've made the simple changes suggested already (capitalisation conventions), and have added the others as low-priority items to try to work in next time I do refactoring, but not as a reason to refactor on their own.

Is that about right? Or is there a different culture of voting here?

A quick browse of meta seems to suggest that maybe people vote less here than elsewhere.

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    \$\begingroup\$ We don't vote enough. \$\endgroup\$ – Mast May 6 '15 at 14:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sometimes when the questions has a lot of content and answers have a lot of content, I don't feel like reading it all. So since I vote on things I agree or find useful I will not vote on post that I've just read like the third of it. \$\endgroup\$ – Marc-Andre May 6 '15 at 15:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ The answer got +3 votes since I posted this, so I guess that answer must be a good one and the answer to my question is "Appraising a code review takes quite a lot of effort, therefore, people tend to be slower to vote than on other sites" \$\endgroup\$ – user568458 May 6 '15 at 16:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ at time of writing this question has recieved 62 visits, which is by no standard a "decent amount of traffic", when compared to questions that have multiple hundred, sometimes even multiple thousand views... \$\endgroup\$ – Vogel612 May 7 '15 at 7:28
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There is another point not mentioned by @Marc-Andre that probably helped you get points on your question: from what I can see, it's your first post on the site, which means that it probably went through the first posts review queue and that it gathered more attention on the question. But if people react like I do, they will make an effort to judge and if possible give a vote to the first post even if they don't know that much about the language. Namely, they will probably make some effort for the first post in the queue, but not for its answers.

That's probably yet another reason why you got votes but the answer didn't get that many votes: it was a good first post.

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Sometimes when the questions has a lot of content and answers have a lot of content, I don't feel like reading it all. So since I vote on things I agree or find useful I will not vote on post that I've just read like the third of it.

You've made a good observation in your comment on your question :

The answer got +3 votes since I posted this, so I guess that answer must be a good one and the answer to my question is "Appraising a code review takes quite a lot of effort, therefore, people tend to be slower to vote than on other sites"

First thing, there is a meta effect on question posted on meta. People will see the linked question read it and vote on it since it's the subject of the question. This happens a lot on SO and other site too.

Second thing is your right, Code Review is a slower site. It's slower for many reasons. Answer are bigger, more complex and need more attention. We are building knowledge on the best practices available in the industry at the moment. Things are more subjective as not every solution/pattern fit every question. There is a lot more involvement in the process and that is what I find make Code Review beautiful.

Last thing, we don't vote enough too.

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