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Last year, two community projects were born.

One of them has been, according to some Github statistics, one of them is a lot more active than the other. Perhaps most importantly, the Rubberduck project has spawned 17 Code Review questions (all but four of the search results seems to be about code from the project itself).

It would make sense to me if a tag was created, to connect all those questions together.

General question:

Is there a point in time where a community project deserves its own tag?

Specific question:

Should we create a tag?


Note: The tag has now been created, with the name

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17 questions is substantial, it is also active, and growing.

There are a number of people who would 'follow' or favourite the tag.

The tag would describe the context in which the code is being developed, and would provide significant information value to anyone inspecting the questions

For the above reasons, I believe the tag would be useful, and should be created.

In addition, it is a nice salute to the origins of the code, that it is 'Home Grown', and so on. It has a 'feel good' factor.

To be clear though, that while there is a feel good factor, this would not be the only reason to create the tag, there is plenty of other justification too.

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Tags for specific community-owned projects are nice, and has been a good tag.

However, this does not mean that anyone and everyone can/should say "I'm gonna post all my code for project XYZ so I'm gonna tag my first question that I will post right now with the XYZ-tag".

It is preferred if the questions come first and the tag later.

There are some other things to consider as well:

  • Is it a long-term project or a short-term project? Can you see yourself posting a question with code from this project one year from now? If it is a short-lived project, it is less likely to deserve its own tag.
  • How much interest have people shown in the project? The more GitHub stars a project has, the more likely it is that it should have a tag.
  • How many developers does the project have? The more developers that will post questions with code from the project, the better.

Note: There will be no "rules" for exactly how many questions, how many stars on GitHub, or how many months, that are needed for it to deserve its own tag.

The general principle should be: Questions first, tag later.

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Disclaimer: I own the Rubberduck project's GitHub repository.


Should we create a tag?

No. The project's name is "Rubberduck", so the tag should be .

Okay then. Should we create a tag?

I'm biased, but I'll say yes, and @rolfl's answer says pretty much everything I'd have to say about why - I'll only add that having this tag will allow me to stop having to introduce and link to the project's website/repository every time. It seems to be community consensus that there's a place for this tag, and I'll happily create it with my next post, and author a detailed wiki for it.


What about then?

That's an easy one: it should not exist, and should never be created either. The reasoning is simple: there's no need for it, even if there were a thousand posts about Rubberduck's COM API.

Any post tagged , is a post about the source code.

Any post tagged is a post about the API.


Is there a point in time where a community project deserves its own tag?

I'd generalize this and swap "community" for "open-source". My thinking on this, is just like any other new tag: when there's enough posts on the main site to justify it. Subjective? Totally. As with all things, it depends - creating a new specific tag should always be done through a meta-discussion, such as this one.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You make a very good point about how the language changes the context in this case. If this occurs for other projects, they are likely to need two separate tags. I can envision a .net library created in C# being used by C#. In that case, the language alone would not give sufficient context. \$\endgroup\$ – RubberDuck May 7 '15 at 19:00
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General Answer

This question asks about Code Review's own community projects. I think it would be okay to make a tag for these, but I think not simply Code Review's community project.

Any open-source project should feel welcome to ask for reviews of their code, and even host official-to-them code reviews over soon-to-be-committed code here on Code Review. Eventually, with enough interest in high quality questions & answers, perhaps it may be time to create a tag for that open-source project.

Importantly, though, with these sorts of open-source-project tags, I feel it is necessary that they have a very good Wiki entry, and perhaps most importantly, a link to the repository for the code within the description for the tag.

Also important would be making sure the tag names themselves are clear and distinct.


Specific Answer

seems a clear enough tag to me, but if we do create let's be certain we set this as a perfect example of what any other open-source-project's tag should look like on Code Review:

  • Make sure anyone on Code Review involved in the project goes through and tags all appropriate questions with the tag.
  • Make sure the Wiki has an excellent description of what the goal of the open source project is, and include a link to the repository for the project.
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