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Almost four years ago, Code Review community went to GitHub. In these past four years, what have we accomplished with this GitHub community?

There are five repositories in the community, four if you don't count the github.io repository.

There's been a few requests about people wanting to join. The two recent requests in the past two years (yay, activity!) have been declined because the users aren't very active on Code Reivew Stack Exchange, and because the GitHub organization haven't really gotten a purpose. There has also been a more meta-issue opened about letting people join.

See also the chat transcript from two years ago where we discussed this GitHub organization.

Given the low activity of our GitHub community, what should we do with it?

  • Abandon the GitHub community and just let everyone have their own personal GitHub profile? (which I know are much more active than the shared Code Review one).
  • Just keep the GitHub community to gather everyone, but without having any real repositories so that it's easy to find other Code Review community members? Is it hard to find members on GitHub today? Stack Exchange has a specific "GitHub profile" field in user profiles.
  • Use it for things like Frequently posted reviews and Frequently posted comments?
  • Put up a lot of stuff there? (What?)
  • Other suggestions?
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, what is the purpose of this GitHub community? I wasn't aware of it, as I've never seen it mentioned here. What would be my reasons for joining? Has ever been mentioned anywhere besides meta? \$\endgroup\$ – user1118321 Nov 19 '17 at 18:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user1118321 That's the whole point of this meta question, to figure out the purpose of it - if there is one. \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Forsberg Nov 19 '17 at 18:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ more related chat talk about the GitHub organization: chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/12712357#12712357 \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Forsberg Nov 19 '17 at 22:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ I've been on CR for the last 530 days consecutive and I've never heard about any GitHub repo ;-| \$\endgroup\$ – t3chb0t Nov 20 '17 at 16:19
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The CR GitHub organization seems to have been a solution in search of a problem.

If after all these years we still don't know what to use it for, let's just kill it.

If it's ever needed again, it will reappear organically.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It's not officially part of SE, so how are you planning to kill it? It's maintained by regulars, yes, but you can't kill what you can't reach. \$\endgroup\$ – Mast Nov 22 '17 at 7:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ I disagree. When comes to git, there's no harm on having things that are no longer used. People can still go there and see what has been done if they want to. If the repo gets deleted it's the same as throwing the work people have done in the past away. Also, some posts, like this one, might raise awareness that such a thing exists. \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Costa Nov 22 '17 at 10:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ @BrunoCosta It's a GitHub organization, not a single repository. The repositories can be transferred to their original authors. \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Forsberg Nov 22 '17 at 19:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you kill something that's already dead? I hadn't heard of it before this question and I'm not exactly a newbie here. \$\endgroup\$ – Edward Dec 2 '17 at 4:36
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If you want to leave the GitHub organization, leave.

That's what I did myself. I personally felt that it doesn't serve a purpose and I personally don't see a reason to stay inside the organization. The last thing I changed before I left was to fix the webhook for the CodeReviewCommunity.github.io repository so that all changes/issues/comments to it gets posted to The 2nd Monitor but anyone with the sufficient permissions in the organization can change this if needed.

I don't think that this GitHub organization should be seen as any "official" Code Review Stack Exchange thing.

If you want to do something with it, do something with it.

It seems like there is still some ideas floating around about possible usages. I encourage these users to actually put their words into action and use the GitHub organization if they want to, communication between other GitHub organization members could be done in The 2nd Monitor or in a newly-created chat room. But it should not be any requirement to put up code there (such as solutions for community challenges hosted on Code Review Stack Exchange).

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This sounded like a good idea that was poorly executed/supported IMHO. I can honestly say I have maybe half a dozen repos and even more Gists that would have probably been better suited as community projects.

I did Hacktoberfest for the first time last month and it was a lot of fun and a great learning experience. The are very few sites dedicated to this sort of open source community coding and the ones that are out there don't get enough attention. I honestly think that if more people knew about them, more people would participate.

I vote to keep it open, and to promote it.


Edit: I didn't read all the ancient chat transcripts but the impression I got from poking around was that the org was for projects that the community could work on together. It feels sort of rude (to me) to just submit a PR on some random repo just because you have a good idea, but if there's a place where you know your PRs are welcome people will be more likely to contribute.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ and when the Github Organization is open and promoted, what should we fill it with? \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Forsberg Nov 21 '17 at 19:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SimonForsberg - I updated my answer. We should allow the community to fill it and let digital darwinism do the rest. people will hack on projects they like and ignore projects they don't. i don't see the community itself needing much moderation, only individual projects. - I think the main issue right now is that it's far too exclusive. \$\endgroup\$ – I wrestled a bear once. Nov 21 '17 at 19:10
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Let me start by saying that although I'm relatively new to the community, I've really enjoyed it so far. Who doesn't want to create the best code possible? I don't fully understand with what purpose the Github was created, but I will try to explain why this would in my opinion be an addition and how it could be used.


But first let me answer your questions.

Abandon the GitHub community and just let everyone have their own personal GitHub profile?

To give user permission to certain codereview repositories instead of a community profile, would be my way to go.

Just keep the GitHub community to gather everyone, but without having any real repositories so that it's easy to find other Code Review community members?

No this would seem unnecessary, because as you stated it is already fairly easy to search for other members on GitHub, just click on their profile.

Use it for things like Frequently posted reviews and Frequently posted comments?

I don't like this idea either, because that is what the whole stackexhange is about, make it easier to see a d compare frequently asked code/questions. To link that through a third party website, would be counterproductive for codereview itself.

Put up a lot of stuff there? (What?)

Community challenges

I think the current community challenge hasn't recieved enough attention, and think that that could be improved if we incorporate it with GitHub. I think It will make for a more competitive platform, and thus would make it more inviting to partake in these kind of challenges. You could see what other people are working on. Now I don't who joined, or is actively busy with the challenge.

My idea for the GitHub account would be to:

  • Integrate GitHub with the community challenges.
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My Bad, I thought I had added my Review Queue Notifier to the Repos there. I personally like the idea of having somewhere that I can share Code Review Specific Projects. I also like the idea of having a place to go when I have spare time and work on public projects to further Code Review's success.

I vote

Put up a lot of stuff there? (What?)

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