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This question already has an answer here:

I created a small project on GitHub for creating a mask for a 3D UV resin printer (using DLP technique) to have a homogenously light intensity across the build area. Although it is small, I like to code following good practices. I added unit test coverage, integration test, try to adhere to SOLID, and work with a kanboard. Anyway. Currently no one else is programming for it besides me. But I like to have some input from others. At work, this usually results in even better code and solutions.

So could I post a GitHub repository and SHA of the commit and ask for an overall review here?

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marked as duplicate by rolfl discussion Apr 26 '18 at 10:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Firstly it seems your question would fit great into our site. You desire feedback on how to improve your code, if there is anything to improve. And would generally be a good question here.

There is one down side however, we require that people post their code on our site. This allows all users to see the code instantly, and prevents our users going to malicious sites in the hopes to find code. It also means that users that have access to some websites blocked can still access your code. Things like Pastebin have been blocked on some users networks, for example.

As you said you'd:

So could I post a GitHub repository and SHA of the commit and ask for an overall review here?

You can do this if you wish, but you also have to still include the code in the question.


Just to note all contributions posted here are licenced under CC BY-SA 3.0. Other users can then change the licence to CC BY-SA 4.0, and then GPL 3.0. If you don't want your code to be accessible under these licences then I'd encourage you to not post your code here however.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Agreed, but one critical reason is because the version of the code being reviewed is important, and if the code changes on GitHub it will "break" the answers. \$\endgroup\$ – rolfl Apr 26 '18 at 10:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rolfl That wouldn't be the case if they link with the SHA. As it'd link to a commit, not latest. \$\endgroup\$ – Peilonrayz Apr 26 '18 at 10:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ But would not help if the user deleted their repo or made it private in the future, either. \$\endgroup\$ – rolfl Apr 26 '18 at 13:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rolfl That's a different argument, and yes, it wouldn't. I didn't give an exhaustive list, just a couple of reasons. If you want you can edit my answer to become an exhaustive list if you want. \$\endgroup\$ – Peilonrayz Apr 26 '18 at 13:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ I actually marked this post as duplicate, with the source being the faq entry on this concept. \$\endgroup\$ – rolfl Apr 26 '18 at 14:03

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