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I am kind of new to Code Review SE (I only have two questions), and am trying to understand the site. I recently came across this question with three downvotes.

For the most part, It seems that it is on topic, but the general consensus is that the OP is using really bad practices.

Now, my first question has four upvotes. The code, as was pointed out by the answers use some poor practices.

Now there must be some difference between my question and the first one. What did I do right that the other person did wring. All I saw( form a quick glance) was the the OP was using poor C++ practices. However, since my questions used bad practices, I am having trouble understanding whats right and wrong

I am not asking for anyone to go on a downvote rampage on my question. I am simple interested in what I did right as opposed to the other person so I can keep a high question quality on this site.

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Are you aware that you keep making the same mistakes over and over?

From a comment

My guess is that this is the source of the down votes. It's a user who keeps asking questions, but isn't learning anything. I don't think it's a good reason to downvote a question though. We should vote on questions, not users.

For the record though, I've never seen a correlation between the quality of code and the number of votes (up or down) here. This site just doesn't work that way. I find that, generally, questions are judged by the quality of the plain English section. How well has OP explained what the code does, any concerns they have, and what they expect from a review is the yardstick we measure questions by here.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I made that comment and perhaps I should add a little to that. It doesn't mean writing bad code is a problem. In contrary, please post it. Bad code needs a review more like an ill person needs a doctor more. This was a very specific case in which I saw the OP not learning from our advice, which had a very specific reason. Do not let that scare you. \$\endgroup\$ – Mast Aug 30 '15 at 11:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ The downvote hint says "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful". When a user doesn't learn from previous questions, I consider that "not show any research effort" and I downvote. \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Forsberg Aug 30 '15 at 11:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ You're entitled to vote that way if you wish @SimonAndréForsberg. I was just sticking to the concept of voting on the question, not the user. I could certainly see the merits of the "lacks research" argument. \$\endgroup\$ – RubberDuck Aug 30 '15 at 11:52
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All stack exchange sites suffer from meta-effect - the action on main-site posts as influenced by discussions on the meta site about that question.

That users' questions were recently discussed here:

Users that appear to learn nothing

Hence the impact on their latest question.

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The other user had been continuously including the bad practices in their code, even after multiple answers had explained the bad practices. The user then notified people that her professor required these bad practices to be included in the code. By this time, most downvotes were locked, and couldn't be reversed.

In short, you're fine.

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